Guest blog: My Gothic Blues by Rudy Simone

by Jude Starling

I’m keeping myself very busy at present, preparing for next year’s publication of The Right of the Subjects, planning my next novel and handling the traditional pre-Christmas editing rush, but luckily I have a guest post to keep you amused! Rudy Simone is an author, musician, singer/songwriter and Asperger’s advocate, and after her kindness in providing a cover quote for Goldcord Asylum I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to introduce people to Rudy’s fantastic new album Gothic Blues. But of course, the creator knows their creation best, so perhaps I should let Rudy make the introductions…

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Rudy Simone

My name is Rudy Simone and I’ve created an album of music called Gothic Blues. What do gothic music and the blues have in common? They both meander the dark corridors of the soul. Both often tell tales of loss, loneliness, love unrequited, even death. Gothic rock—a term first used to describe the Doors’ music in 1969 but made popular with the rise of 80s groups like The Cure—tends to do it in a more minor way than the other. But not always. Early blues classics such as St. James Infirmary, I Won’t Be Here Long, Strange Fruit and Lawd You Made the Night Too Long are spooky, horn-driven lamentations that invoke images of cemeteries bathed in moonlight.

So maybe I’ve convinced you that Goth and Blues are cousins, but what do either of these things have to do with Asperger’s? For I’m known as a writer of Aspergian books that have made a small ripple in the world, helping to change what we know about this kind of autism and female aspies in particular. Dry subject, isn’t it? Non-fiction, academic?

There is nothing academic about the way I view and live in the world. The most famous autistics in the world are usually scientists, but so many more of us are artists, poets, writers. We are driven indoors, unable to communicate effectively with a world that confounds us , so we take brush to canvas, pen to paper, bow to string. This is our method of reaching out to others, hoping that the wavelength we are sending our signal on will be heard and responded to by like-minded souls.

With my album Gothic Blues and my next album currently in production, I’m reaching out to my people, wherever they are, saying “Have you ever felt like this? Yeah, me too. Let’s sing about it, each in the privacy of our own safe haven.” No big stages for me, no MTV appearances. I want to be in your chamber, in your ear, speaking to you one on one about these dark, sometimes joyful but always beautiful emotions.

Gothic Blues can be downloaded on iTunes (US; UK), Bandcamp, CD Baby or RudySimone.net

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